Dedi

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'''Dedi''' (also Djedi or Djedi of Djed-Sneferu) is the name of a ancient Egyptian magician appearing in the fourth chapter of a '''story''' told in the legendary Westcar Papyrus. He is said to have worked wonders during the reign of king (pharaoh) Khufu (4th Dynasty).
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'''Dedi''' (also Djedi or Djedi of Djed-Sneferu) is the name of an ancient Egyptian magician appearing in the fourth chapter of a '''story''' told in the legendary Westcar Papyrus. He is said to have worked wonders during the reign of king (pharaoh) Khufu (4th Dynasty).
  
 
Dedi appears only in the fourth story of the Westcar Papyrus - there is no archeological or historical evidence that he existed. Nevertheless he is object of great interest for historians and Egyptologists, since his magic tricks are connected to later cultural perceptions of the personality of king Khufu. Dedi is described as a commoner of extraordinary age, endowed with magical powers and talented in making prophecies.  
 
Dedi appears only in the fourth story of the Westcar Papyrus - there is no archeological or historical evidence that he existed. Nevertheless he is object of great interest for historians and Egyptologists, since his magic tricks are connected to later cultural perceptions of the personality of king Khufu. Dedi is described as a commoner of extraordinary age, endowed with magical powers and talented in making prophecies.  

Revision as of 21:37, 9 February 2012

Dedi
Born?

NationalityEgyptian

Dedi (also Djedi or Djedi of Djed-Sneferu) is the name of an ancient Egyptian magician appearing in the fourth chapter of a story told in the legendary Westcar Papyrus. He is said to have worked wonders during the reign of king (pharaoh) Khufu (4th Dynasty).

Dedi appears only in the fourth story of the Westcar Papyrus - there is no archeological or historical evidence that he existed. Nevertheless he is object of great interest for historians and Egyptologists, since his magic tricks are connected to later cultural perceptions of the personality of king Khufu. Dedi is described as a commoner of extraordinary age, endowed with magical powers and talented in making prophecies.

According to the Westcar Papyrus, prince Djedefhor brings up the story of Dedi. He stands before his father, king Khufu, and says: “There is only speaking of miracles which happened a long time ago, something known by past generations only. Truth and falsehood cannot be distinguished here. But there is someone under thy majesty´s own lifetime who is not known, someone who is able to make a ignoramus become wise.” Khufu asks: “What's the meaning of this, Djedefhor, my son?” Djedefhor answers: “There's a commoner named Dedi, living in Djed-Sneferu. He's a simple citizen, but 110 years old, eats 500 loaves of bread, a shoulder of beef and drinks 100 jars of beer every day. He is capable of resurrecting decapitated beings. He is also said to be able to make wild lions so obedient that the animal would follow him with a cord dragging on the ground."[1]

He was inducted into the Society of American Magicians Hall of Fame and Magic Museum.

References

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a page hosted on Wikipedia. Please consult the history of the original page to see a list of its authors. Therefor, this article is also available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License

  1. The History of Magic by Kurt Volkmann
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