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Difference between revisions of "Himber Ring"

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(New page: Himber Ring was an idea from Perci Diaconis that was further developed into a routine by Richard Himber. Borrowing three separate rings, from three different spectators in the ...)
 
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[[Himber Ring]] was an idea from [[Perci Diaconis]] that was further developed into a routine by [[Richard Himber]]. Borrowing three separate rings, from three different spectators in the audience, the magician links them all together. They are then unlinked and passed back to their respective owners.
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[[Himber Ring]] (or '''Linking Finger Rings''')  was an idea from [[Persi Diaconis]] that was further developed into a routine by [[Richard Himber]]. After borrowing three separate rings, from three different spectators, the magician links them all together. They are then unlinked and passed back.
  
[[Category:Props]]
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It has been featured by [[Harry Anderson]], [[Jonathan Pendragon]], and [[Kreskin]].
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[[Orson Welles]] created a version for his "Mercury Wonder Show" in which many rings, borrowed from audience, were linked together in a long chain.<ref>Ten Greatest Magical Effects of the Twentieth Century by T. A. Waters, Magic Magazine, January 2001</ref>
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== Marketed ==
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*StaggeRing (1961)
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*ToweRing (1964)
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== References ==
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<references />
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[[Category:Illusions]]
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[[Category:Prop]]

Latest revision as of 13:14, 9 June 2011

Himber Ring (or Linking Finger Rings) was an idea from Persi Diaconis that was further developed into a routine by Richard Himber. After borrowing three separate rings, from three different spectators, the magician links them all together. They are then unlinked and passed back.

It has been featured by Harry Anderson, Jonathan Pendragon, and Kreskin.

Orson Welles created a version for his "Mercury Wonder Show" in which many rings, borrowed from audience, were linked together in a long chain.[1]

Marketed

  • StaggeRing (1961)
  • ToweRing (1964)

References

  1. Ten Greatest Magical Effects of the Twentieth Century by T. A. Waters, Magic Magazine, January 2001