Help us get to over 4,000 biographies in 2016.

If you know of a past magician not listed in MagicPedia, start a New Biography for them or Email us your suggestion.

Difference between revisions of "Indian Basket Trick"

From Magicpedia, the free online encyclopedia for magicians by magicians.
Jump to: navigation, search
(References)
m
 
Line 1: Line 1:
{{Youtube Thumb|wtpzVvuUJuk}}
+
'''Indian Basket Trick''' (or Hindu Basket Trick or Sword Basket) is a trick with a wicker basket in which an assistant is put into the basket and the performer then thrust swords through it. The trick ends while the child or assistant either climbs out of the basket or reappears from behind the crowd unharmed. {{Youtube Thumb|wtpzVvuUJuk}}
[[Indian Basket Trick]] (or Hindu Basket Trick) is a trick with a wicker basket in which an assistant is put into the basket and the performer then thrust swords through it. The trick ends while the child or assistant either climbs out of the basket or reappears from behind the crowd unharmed.  
+
  
The Indian Basket trick was adapted by [[Colonel Stodare]] and presented at the Theatre of Mystery, [[Egyptian Hall]] in 1865.  
+
The Indian Basket trick was adapted by [[Colonel Stodare]] and presented at the Theatre of Mystery, [[Egyptian Hall]] in [[1865]].  
 +
 
 +
 
 +
{{References}}
  
== References ==
 
 
* [[Secrets of Stage Conjuring]] by [[Jean Eugène Robert-Houdin]]
 
* [[Secrets of Stage Conjuring]] by [[Jean Eugène Robert-Houdin]]
 
* http://www.mazmaindia.com/the-indian-basket.php
 
* http://www.mazmaindia.com/the-indian-basket.php
  
 
[[Category:Illusions]]
 
[[Category:Illusions]]

Latest revision as of 08:16, 27 January 2013

Indian Basket Trick (or Hindu Basket Trick or Sword Basket) is a trick with a wicker basket in which an assistant is put into the basket and the performer then thrust swords through it. The trick ends while the child or assistant either climbs out of the basket or reappears from behind the crowd unharmed.

The Indian Basket trick was adapted by Colonel Stodare and presented at the Theatre of Mystery, Egyptian Hall in 1865.


References