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Difference between revisions of "J. M. MacAllister"

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'''J. M. MacAllister''' was the stage name of John Mawer (or Moir or Mahr or Mawhr), a minor professional illusionist who performed in the United States in the late 1800s.
 
'''J. M. MacAllister''' was the stage name of John Mawer (or Moir or Mahr or Mawhr), a minor professional illusionist who performed in the United States in the late 1800s.
  
He claimed to be a relative of [[Andrew MacAllister‎]] (possibly a nephew). He moved to United States where, starting around l870, he become popular with a give-away show.<ref>Barton Whaley. Whaley's Who's Who in Magic. (1990): 213</ref>
+
He claimed to be a relative of [[Andrew MacAllister‎]] (possibly a nephew). He moved to United States where, starting around 1870, he become popular with a give-away show.<ref>Barton Whaley. Whaley's Who's Who in Magic. (1990): 213</ref>
  
 
Mawer spent the last four years of his life in San Francisco, California and his remains, after being used for scientific purposes, were interred in the Potter's Field.<ref>Henry Ridgely Evans,History of Conjuring and Magic. (1928): 146</ref>
 
Mawer spent the last four years of his life in San Francisco, California and his remains, after being used for scientific purposes, were interred in the Potter's Field.<ref>Henry Ridgely Evans,History of Conjuring and Magic. (1928): 146</ref>

Revision as of 16:45, 8 February 2013

J. M. MacAllister
BornJohn Mawer
circa 1837
Scotland
DiedOctober 21, 1899 (age 61)

J. M. MacAllister was the stage name of John Mawer (or Moir or Mahr or Mawhr), a minor professional illusionist who performed in the United States in the late 1800s.

He claimed to be a relative of Andrew MacAllister‎ (possibly a nephew). He moved to United States where, starting around 1870, he become popular with a give-away show.[1]

Mawer spent the last four years of his life in San Francisco, California and his remains, after being used for scientific purposes, were interred in the Potter's Field.[2]

References

  1. Barton Whaley. Whaley's Who's Who in Magic. (1990): 213
  2. Henry Ridgely Evans,History of Conjuring and Magic. (1928): 146