Tony Andruzzi

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* The linking Ring, Vol. 72, No. 3, March 1992, Tom Palmer Succumbs by Terry Nosek, page 111, Obituary TONY ANDRUZZI A.K.A. TOM PALMER, page 120  
 
* The linking Ring, Vol. 72, No. 3, March 1992, Tom Palmer Succumbs by Terry Nosek, page 111, Obituary TONY ANDRUZZI A.K.A. TOM PALMER, page 120  
 
* Cover & Article page 15 [[Genii 2000 October|Genii, Vol. 63, No. 10, October 2000]]
 
* Cover & Article page 15 [[Genii 2000 October|Genii, Vol. 63, No. 10, October 2000]]
* [[Genii 2005 February|Genii, Vol. 68, No. 2, February 2005]], "Tell Jack Ruby not to send the letter ..." by Richard Hatch, page 25 (refers to: Testimony of Thomas Stewart Palmer, on July 24, 1964,  
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* [[Genii 2005 February|Genii, Vol. 68, No. 2, February 2005]], "Tell Jack Ruby not to send the letter ..." by Richard Hatch, page 25 (refers to: Testimony of Thomas Stewart Palmer, on July 24, 1964, http://jfkassassination.net/russ/testimony/palmer_t.htm)
http://jfkassassination.net/russ/testimony/palmer_t.htm  
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* [http://www.dragonskull.co.uk/mym.htm A Tony Andruzzi Memorial]
 
* [http://www.dragonskull.co.uk/mym.htm A Tony Andruzzi Memorial]
  

Revision as of 08:46, 30 March 2013

Tony Andruzzi
BornTimothy McGuire
May 22, 1925
Cheyenne, Wyoming
DiedDecember 21, 1991 (age 66)
Northwestern Hospital in Chicago
Known forBizarre Magick

Tony Andruzzi (1925-1991) was born Timothy McGuire on May 22, 1925 in Cheyenne, Wyoming, performed as Tom Palmer, Masklyn ye Mage and Daemon Ecks. Andruzzi made numerous notable contributions to the art of Bizarre Magic, ranging from major contributions to the philosophy of the art form and numerous magical effects to helping develop and maintain the community of artists.


Contents

Biography

He was re-christened within his first year by his foster parents, Charles and Gertrude Palmer, as Thomas Stewart Palmer. He was married four times and took the name Tony Andruzzi after divorce from his second wife Bunny.

From the 1950s to the early 1970s his performances were comedy illusions. He adopted the name Tom Palmer and had his legal name changed to Thomas S. Palmer. Under the name Tom Palmer, he published several pieces of magic including The Flea Circus Act, Modern Illusions and The Comedy Act of Tom Palmer.

He was married from 1947 to 1964 to Gloria Jacobson, for whom he designed her "Vampira" act in 1960. In 1970 he reclaimed Antonio C. Andruzzi as an alternative legal name. He started performing in a style known as bizarre magic and became a preeminent founder and contributor to the movement.

He invented his "Satan's Seat" illusion by 1959.

From 1981 to 1991 he became editor of the bizarre magic magazine New Invocation, one of the cornerstone publications in solidifying the movement. By issue #12 (Oct. ‘82) he had become publisher as well, and continued with the publication through issue #60 (Dec. ’90).” As a bizarrist, he published books which are highly valued for their content, scarcity and handmade artistry.

Andruzzi founded an an annual conclave of bizarrists known as the "Invocational", which were held from 1984 until 1990.

With Brian Flora, he produced an instructional magic video on bizarre magic called Bizarre which documents many of his notable creations as a bizarrist. In addition, he appeared in an interview with Eugene Burger on his instructional magic video Eugene Goes Bizarre. Andruzzi's contributions to the art of bizarre magic have made him a revered name in the community of bizarre magicians.

Awards and honors

  • 7 TAOM awards from 1959 to 1963.

Books

  • Unspeakable Acts: Three Lives and Countless Legends of Tom Palmer, Tony Andruzzi, Masldyn ye Mage (2011) [1]

As Tom Palmer:

  • Modern Illusions (1959)
  • The Tie Pitch (1960)
  • The Vampira Act (1960)
  • The Famous Flea Act (1962)
  • Cagey Doves (1962)
  • The Comedy Act of and by Tom Palmer (1969)
  • Rolon – Tom Palmer's Great Table

As Masklyn ye Mage:

  • The Negromicon of Masklyn ye Mage (1977)
  • Grimoire of the Mages (1980)
  • Daemon's Diary (1980)
  • The Legendary Scroll of Masklyn ye Mage (1983)

References

  1. Genii, Vol. 74, Nr. 5, May 2011, Books REVIEWED BY JAMY IAN SWISS, page 89
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