U.F. Grant

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(Contributions)
(Books)
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* 25 Rising Card Tricks (1935)
 
* 25 Rising Card Tricks (1935)
 
* [[Grant's Annual of Magic]] (1935) reprint as Grant's Manual of Magic in 1964
 
* [[Grant's Annual of Magic]] (1935) reprint as Grant's Manual of Magic in 1964
* Tricks with Magnets (1935) reprint in 1940.
+
* [[Tricks with Magnets]] (1935) reprint in 1940.
 
* [[100 Tips & Gags]] (1936)
 
* [[100 Tips & Gags]] (1936)
 
* [[100 More Tips and Gags]] (1937)
 
* [[100 More Tips and Gags]] (1937)
* 50 Kute Koin Tricks (1940)
+
* [[50 Kute Koin Tricks]] (1940)
 
* [[50 Crazy Card Stunts]] (1940)
 
* [[50 Crazy Card Stunts]] (1940)
 
* Paper Magic (1941)
 
* Paper Magic (1941)
 
* [[Six Modern Levitations]] (1943)
 
* [[Six Modern Levitations]] (1943)
 +
* Grant's Secrets (1943)
 
* Grant's Volume One (1944)
 
* Grant's Volume One (1944)
 
* 25 Telephone Card Tricks (1945)
 
* 25 Telephone Card Tricks (1945)

Revision as of 05:37, 30 November 2011

U.F. Grant (January 12, 1901- March 1, 1978) born Ulysses Frederick Grant in Millerton, New York. Known as "Gen", he was a magic dealer and inventor. Grant started in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, where he created his first tricks. Later he moved to New York City joining the Abbott Magic & Novelty Co., eventually settled in Columbus, Ohio creating his own firm.

U.F. Grant
BornJanuary 12 1901
Millerton, New York
DiedMarch 01, 1978 (age 77)

In 1944, he partnered with R.N. Menge creating a line of products known as "Grant and Menge" or "G. & M.". The partnership only lasted a year and they ended up becoming rivals.

He created a long line of pamphlet-type magic booklets, which were often affectionately joked about by magicians for their brevity. Don Tanner wrote directions for and illustrated many of the items marketed by the Grant company.

Grant was a member of the IBM, SAM, the Order of Merlin, and the Columbus Magic Club Ring 7.

"MAK Magic" still manufactures many of his items which is run by his daughter Mary Ann King and grandson Jimmy P. King.

Contributions

  • Temple Screen
  • Cow Trick
  • Chink Cans
  • Cheek to Cheek (1948)
  • Bengal Net Illusion (1954)

Books

References

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