Help us get to over 4,000 biographies in 2018.

If you know of a past magician not listed in MagicPedia, start a New Biography for them or Email us your suggestion.

Difference between revisions of "Bill Woodfield"

From Magicpedia, the free online encyclopedia for magicians by magicians.
Jump to: navigation, search
m
Line 7: Line 7:
 
| birth_day                = January 21,
 
| birth_day                = January 21,
 
| birth_year                = 1928
 
| birth_year                = 1928
| birth_place              =  
+
| birth_place              = San Francisco, California
 
| death_day                = November 24,
 
| death_day                = November 24,
 
| death_year                = 2001
 
| death_year                = 2001
| death_place              =  
+
| death_place              = Los Angeles, California
 
| resting_place            =  
 
| resting_place            =  
 
| resting_place_coordinates =   
 
| resting_place_coordinates =   
Line 31: Line 31:
  
 
{{References}}
 
{{References}}
 
+
{{Wikipedia|William_Woodfield}}
 
+
 
+
  
  
 
[[Category:Biographies]]
 
[[Category:Biographies]]
 
{{DEFAULTSORT:Woodfield,Bill}}
 
{{DEFAULTSORT:Woodfield,Bill}}

Revision as of 12:44, 20 October 2014

Bill Woodfield
BornJanuary 21, 1928
San Francisco, California
DiedNovember 24, 2001 (age 73)
Los Angeles, California

William Read Woodfield (January 21, 1928 - November 24, 2001) was an Emmy-nominated movie and television producer and amateur magician.

Biography

Woodfield started the magic newsletter Magicana which was later published in Genii as a magazine within a magazine .

He wrote scripts for many television series including "Columbo", "Perry Mason," "Ironside." and "Diagnosis Murder." As a story consultant for the television series "Mission Impossible," often worked magical illusions into the story lines.

Woodfield was also an artist and photographer. His photos have appeared in magazines including Esquire, Harper's Bazaar and the Saturday Evening Post. His first professional photo assignment was a picture of Elizabeth Taylor with her new baby, which appeared in Life magazine. Woodfield was a still photographer for films, including "Sparticus." He also designed record albums and magazine layouts for Frank Sinatra. He left photography in the 1960s to pursue a his writing career.[1][2]

References

  1. http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0940251/
  2. Obit Genii 2002 February
Wikipedia-logo.png This page incorporated content from William_Woodfield,

a page hosted on Wikipedia. Please consult the history of the original page to see a list of its authors. Therefor, this article is also available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License