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Difference between revisions of "Conjuror's Magazine (Locke)"

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'''The Conjuror's Magazine''' subtitled "or Magical and Physiognomical Mirror" by William Locke started with a periodical on all things magic, including everything from card tricks to occultism. Volumes 1 and 2 ran from  1791 to 1793. Astrology became such a major theme of its articles so it changed its name in August 1793 to the Astrologer's Magazine and ran for six more issues.   
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'''The Conjuror's Magazine''' subtitled "or Magical and Physiognomical Mirror" by William Locke started as a [[Magic Periodical]] including everything from card tricks to occultism. Volumes one and two ran from  1791 to 1793. Astrology became such a major theme of its articles that it changed its name in August 1793 to the Astrologer's Magazine and ran for six more issues.   
 
[[Image:LockesConjurorMag.jpg|thumb|right]]
 
[[Image:LockesConjurorMag.jpg|thumb|right]]
  

Revision as of 16:03, 10 December 2008

The Conjuror's Magazine subtitled "or Magical and Physiognomical Mirror" by William Locke started as a Magic Periodical including everything from card tricks to occultism. Volumes one and two ran from 1791 to 1793. Astrology became such a major theme of its articles that it changed its name in August 1793 to the Astrologer's Magazine and ran for six more issues.

LockesConjurorMag.jpg

It was the first periodical in which a group advertised themselves openly as workers of magic.

The list of contents for the first issue on August 1791:

  • ASTROLOGY
    • Horary Regency of the Plants
    • Decumbiture of a Gentleman, &c.
    • [Astrological] Tables
    • Explanation of, and Directions for, using the [astrological] Tables
  • Philosophical and ingenious Amusements
    • Surprising and entertaining Deceptions on Cards
  • A Mathematical Combination, &c.
    • How to Guess the Thoughts of any Person
    • The Art of Fortune-Telling by Cards
    • To make Sport and cause Mirth with Quicksilver
    • The Old Woman and the Dumplings
  • The Art of telling Fortunes by the Lines in the Hands
  • Physical Amusements from Pinetti
    • To make a Ring shift from one Hand to another, &c.
    • To Guess by Smelling, &c.
  • Legerdemain Performances.
    • To make one Pen-knife out of Three, jump out of a Goblet
    • To pull off any Person's Shirt, without undressing him.
  • Metallurgy
    • Method of Assaying Gold and Silver by a short Process

Some of the magic articles in the December, 1791 issue:

  • "To Make a Person Tired or Sweat at Carrying a Small Paper or Stick Out of the Room."
  • "A Droll Trick With a Cock."
  • "The Cambridge Scholar, or a Comical Trick Played With a Fowl."
  • "Ingenious Method of Throwing a Ring Out of a Window on a Dark Night and Causing It to be Found in Gentleman's Pocket or Sleeve, as Performed by Herman Boaz.'"

Issues

  • Volume 1
    • 1 (Aug 1791)
    • 2 (Sep 1791)
    • 3 (Oct 1791)
    • 4 (Nov 1791)
    • 5 (Dec 1791)
    • 6 (Jan 1792) [Printed as ‘Feb’ in error]
    • 7 (Feb 1792)
    • 8 (Mar 1792)
    • 9 (April 1792)
    • 10 (May 1792)
    • 11 (Jun 1792)
    • 12 (Jul 1792)
  • Volume 2
    • 13 (August 1792)
    • 14 (Sep 1792)
    • 15 (Oct 1792)
    • 16 (Nov 1792)
    • 17 (Dec 1792)
    • 18 (Jan 1793)
    • 19 (Feb 1793)
    • 20 (March 1793)
    • 21 (April 1793)
    • 22 (May 1793)
    • 23 (June 1793)
    • 24 (July 1793)
  • Volume 3
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6