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Difference between revisions of "Joseph K. Schmidt"

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Joseph Kenneth Schmidt (February 17, 1920 - ) was born in Pinconning, Michigan.  Schmidt is an amatuer magician and illustrator that has worked on close to 100 books on magic.
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Joseph Kenneth Schmidt (February 17, 1920 - February 17, 2007) was born in Pinconning, Michigan.  Schmidt is an amatuer magician and illustrator that has worked on close to 100 books on magic.
  
 
One of Schmidt's first attempts at magic book illustrations was in the 1940's with [[Jean Hugard]] on [[Expert Card Technique]], but they ended up using Donna Allen instead.
 
One of Schmidt's first attempts at magic book illustrations was in the 1940's with [[Jean Hugard]] on [[Expert Card Technique]], but they ended up using Donna Allen instead.

Revision as of 05:48, 23 June 2009

Joseph Kenneth Schmidt (February 17, 1920 - February 17, 2007) was born in Pinconning, Michigan. Schmidt is an amatuer magician and illustrator that has worked on close to 100 books on magic.

One of Schmidt's first attempts at magic book illustrations was in the 1940's with Jean Hugard on Expert Card Technique, but they ended up using Donna Allen instead.


Schmidt served in the Army Air Corps from 1941 to 1945 and reenlisted in 1949 to spend sixteen more years in the military, with the later years as a cryptographer.

Schmidt first published illustration was for a one-hand riffle shuffle that appeared in Hugard's Magic Monthly December, 1944.

In 1970, Joseph K. Schmidt submitted to Karl Fulves a coin flourish complete with illustrations. The contribution was published in Volume 5, Issue #10 of Pallbearers. Fulves was very impressed with Schmidt's artistic abilities and just happened to be looking for an artist to illustrate some more lengthier routines. He asked Schmidt to illustrate "Canterbury Cups" and Schmidt agreed. Fulves and Schmidt's relationship grew and it continues to this day. Fulves was the first person to refer to Schmidt as an "artist". Schmidt has illustrated over 75 books, manuscripts and booklets for Fulves, including Swindle Sheet, Cheat Sheet. Rigmarole, and Verbatim.

Books (as author)

  • The Impromptu Close-up Card Rise (1967)
  • Modern Close-up Card Problems (1981)
  • The Schmidt Gambling Trio (three manuscripts) (1985)
  • Schmidt Riffle Shuffle Run-Up Trix (three manuscripts) (1985)
  • Connie Bush's Color Isolation (1988)
  • New Card Control Systems (1995)

References

  • THE ART OF DECEPTION or The Magical Affinity Between Conjuring and Art by Chuck Romano, Linking Ring, January 1996.