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Difference between revisions of "Snapper"

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(Created page with "'''Snapper''' or '''Red Snapper''' is an gag type effect in which the magician is the only person that can catch a hook on a rubber band inside a cylinder. [[File:Snapper.jpg|...")
 
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Invented [[G. W. Hunter]] in the 1910s and brought to the United States by [[Horace Goldin]] in 1920. With permission, [[Joe Berg]] became the first to mass  market it.  Originally designed as a wooden pencil with a bullet-shaped end that fit into a tube, it was later substituted with a hook for the pencil and added the rubber band to a red tube's bottom  by [[S.S. Adams]] to become a standard joke-shop novelty item.<ref>The Encyclopedic Dictionary of Magic 1584-1988 by Whaley, Bart  (1989) </ref>
 
Invented [[G. W. Hunter]] in the 1910s and brought to the United States by [[Horace Goldin]] in 1920. With permission, [[Joe Berg]] became the first to mass  market it.  Originally designed as a wooden pencil with a bullet-shaped end that fit into a tube, it was later substituted with a hook for the pencil and added the rubber band to a red tube's bottom  by [[S.S. Adams]] to become a standard joke-shop novelty item.<ref>The Encyclopedic Dictionary of Magic 1584-1988 by Whaley, Bart  (1989) </ref>
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== Publications ==
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* The "Snapper" Move  in [[Sankey Unleashed]]
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*The Fabulous Red Snapper (Scotty York) in [[Magicana New Series]] and [[Genii 1975 May]]
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* REVERSE RED SNAPPER by Ed Marlo in [[Genii 1976 February]]
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{{References}}
 
{{References}}

Revision as of 20:21, 21 July 2013

Snapper or Red Snapper is an gag type effect in which the magician is the only person that can catch a hook on a rubber band inside a cylinder.
Ad in Magician Monthly (Nov 1935)


Invented G. W. Hunter in the 1910s and brought to the United States by Horace Goldin in 1920. With permission, Joe Berg became the first to mass market it. Originally designed as a wooden pencil with a bullet-shaped end that fit into a tube, it was later substituted with a hook for the pencil and added the rubber band to a red tube's bottom by S.S. Adams to become a standard joke-shop novelty item.[1]

Publications


References

  1. The Encyclopedic Dictionary of Magic 1584-1988 by Whaley, Bart (1989)